The Exquisite Line: Fabienne Verdier

https://vimeo.com/16164763

As a sign of the times I must write that the work artist cannot be reduced to a tweet. The poetic and elegant simplicity, the raw beauty, of the Fabienne Verdier’s work reduces me to a dot of pure feeling. My heart trembles in response to my eyes exposure to it and I feel displaced with humility. Why can’t I be making work like this?

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As a sign of the times I must write that the work artist cannot be reduced to a tweet. The poetic and elegant simplicity, the raw beauty, of the Fabienne Verdier‘s work reduces me to a dot of pure feeling. My heart trembles in response to my eyes exposure to it and I feel displaced with humility. Why can’t I be making work like this?

Verdier making art
Verdier making art

Verdier works with scale, with detail, with form and composition. She works in a way that is simple but calculated, she trained with Chinese Masters of calligraphy, her art is in the lines and the potency of each stroke that she makes. The colours that she uses are sensational, evocative, and considered, they are powerful, she does not make dull work. The technique she uses in constructing her work is as fascinating as the work itself and a film on her process has been made.

Artist with work
Artist with work

Consider her in relation to abstract artists, to calligraphers, understand the emotional effects of her work. Consider her work in relation to figurative paintings and studies, the focus on form and on balance. Consider Verdier’s work in relation to philosophy such as the Kantian ‘Sublime’.

This was ripped directly from Wikipedia:

Immanuel Kant

Viviano Codazzi: Rendition of St. Peter's Square, Rome, dated 1630. Kant referred to St. Peter's as "splendid", a term he used for objects producing feeling for both the beautiful and the sublime.

Viviano Codazzi: Rendition of St. Peter’s Square, Rome, dated 1630. Kant referred to St. Peter’s as “splendid”, a term he used for objects producing feeling for both the beautiful and the sublime.

Kant, in 1764, made an attempt to record his thoughts on the observing subject’s mental state in Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime. He held that the sublime was of three kinds: the noble, the splendid, and the terrifying.

In his Critique of Judgment (1790), Kant officially says that there are two forms of the sublime, the mathematical and the dynamical, although some commentators hold that there is a third form, the moral sublime, a layover from the earlier “noble” sublime. Kant claims, “We call that sublime which is absolutely great”. He distinguishes between the “remarkable differences” of the Beautiful and the Sublime, noting that beauty “is connected with the form of the object”, having “boundaries”, while the sublime “is to be found in a formless object”, represented by a “boundlessness”. Kant evidently divides the sublime into the mathematical and the dynamical, where in the mathematical “aesthetical comprehension” is not a consciousness of a mere greater unit, but the notion of absolute greatness not inhibited with ideas of limitations. The dynamically sublime is “nature considered in an aesthetic judgment as might that has no dominion over us”, and an object can create a fearfulness “without being afraid of it”. He considers both the beautiful and the sublime as “indefinite” concepts, but where beauty relates to the “Understanding”, sublime is a concept belonging to “Reason”, and “shows a faculty of the mind surpassing every standard of Sense”. For Kant, one’s inability to grasp the enormity of a sublime event such as an earthquake demonstrates inadequacy of one’s sensibility and imagination. Simultaneously, one’s ability to subsequently identify such an event as singular and whole indicates the superiority of one’s cognitive, supersensible powers. Ultimately, it is this “supersensible substrate,” underlying both nature and thought, on which true sublimity is located.

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