Recent events: Falmouth: Bikes and Cocks: Its just an audition

Recently and in no particular order there have been birthdays, rendez-vous, exchanges, travels planned, meals cooked, plans made, plans failed, a hard-drive corrupted, library books were withdrawn, books read, and rain has fallen consistently. None of this is of any relevance to anyone however I feel, in the light of losing a hard-drive of what I would have liked to have called memories and memorabilia [the contemporary technological kind] the idea of exposing redundant information online no longer seems senseless. In fact it seems sensible. What use is information if we don’t share it? What was the point of all those artworks that I made, documented and lost? What was the point of storing evidence of holidays, of creating fantastic images that I liked but were not quite good enough. If I miss them and regret losing them they must have been of some degree of quality. Not all, but some were worth missing. So with this in mind I have decided it makes sense to upload more information than is really necessary onto the internet. Because it doesn’t matter. Its not pretentious, its not contrived, its not even egotistical. I write this as a safe guard, on the off chance that it is read, in the future people won’t even think twice about appearing egotistical. Most people who worry about this problem have facebook -as if thats not a severely contrived case of personal identity management.

Here are some photos of Andrius Savickas with his bike – these photos were meant to be for the ebay sale. However these ones didn’t quite turn out well enough and the novelty of the wall just didn’t seem novel enough.

Andrius from behind - this bike in the foreground is for sale
Andrius from behind - this bike in the foreground is for sale
Andrius poses with the bike on the wall, but it doesn't really achieve anything, its just not dynamic in any way
Andrius poses with the bike on the wall, but it doesn't really achieve anything, its just not dynamic in any way
Again, I'm not sure what we are trying to achieve with this photograph, Ebay buyers would really have to be quite strange to find this image interesting. I also get the feeling that what we are doing officially lacks imagination.
Again, I'm not sure what we are trying to achieve with this photograph, Ebay buyers would really have to be quite strange to find this image interesting. I also get the feeling that what we are doing officially lacks imagination.
Another great advertisement for the bike
Another great advertisement for the bike
I thought this might help it sell
I thought this might help it sell

My attempt at looking suave with the bike didn’t really work because I made the bike look tiny, and I have pretty squinty eyes going on here too.

These photos are with descriptions so they are self-explanatory.

This was amazing, Georg Kluever-Pfandtner spent over two hours cutting my hair away and boy did he make good on it. I've never had anyone spend so long on my hair and it made me feel quite indebted and actually quite special. Strange.
This was amazing, Georg Kluever-Pfandtner spent over two hours cutting my hair away and boy did he make good on it. I've never had anyone spend so long on my hair and it made me feel quite indebted and actually quite special. Strange.
Theme: 60's
Theme: 60's

The above picture doesn’t do our outfits justice.

PopUP tents and Walking through time (An installation for Cappadocia)

After several reconfigurations, transformations, and technical upheavals, I think the concept for Cappadocia has came to a point where-in it will develop in a near linear trajectory towards a very particular design. One that habitats all of the concerns of the artist and the host space itself.

The original concept was conceived as an installation bubble form that would occupy the space of a specific Cappadocian cave excavation. This rapidly evolved, morphing into a conceptual cave that featured frescoes that were ‘lifted’ from the original cave wall. The original cave space was to be reformed, re-envisioned – what ought we do with these frescoes now we can lift them from their original setting?

Roughly approximating the form of the installation. A dome environment that is bold and artificial in appearance.(Charcoal and watercolour drawing.)
Roughly approximating the form of the installation. A dome environment that is bold and artificial in appearance.(Charcoal and watercolour drawing.)

As a walk through, or promenade, installation, the new and old can merge to create a bridge between cultures, between spaces, between people, and between times. Instead of perceiving that a site is ‘before our time’, an audience would have to contemplate their comprehension of Being and of being now. This experience would repercuss upon an audience member’s perception during their later experience as well as being affected by their experience attained a priori. The question is, what affect does this piece of work have on the individual in terms of their relationship to the original space.

The design of the installation was to be in accordance with notions of the uncanny. This decision was considered the only logical actuality, the landscape and the situation already occupies territory we would label as the uncanny and the juxtaposition of artworks, existing and new, would be complicated. There must be an acknowledgment of the cave excavation as a “gestalt”, a whole, wherein the placement of a new piece of work risks coming into contradiction not only with the frescoes but the purposes of the space, the social perception of the site, the architecture, the material properties of the space and the acoustic resonance inherent to it. When it comes to engaging with the site specific work there is a risk that the space will dominate the artwork or the interests of the audience members and whilst this might be effective it is worth attempting to develop a relationship which is more symbiotic. The installation must complement or dialogue superfluously with the original space even if the visual spectacle itself is invasive or aggressive towards the original nature of the space. [I’m not sure how much this is a reflection of my own ideological outlook on life]

A concept that has been consistently present in the development of the work is the appropriation of existing images from the cave space to constructed installation. The format of the images is still being considered and depends largely on the ability of the artist to put ideas into practise.

Sketch appropriating the form of pop-up tents to create a tunnel or a similar artificial space. (Charcoal, watercolour, and vaseline)
Sketch appropriating the form of pop-up tents to create a tunnel or a similar artificial space. (Charcoal, watercolour, and vaseline)

Methods for creating the visual representation of the frescoes and the installation include using heat transfer paper, photopolymer emulsion, sculptural forms, tensioned and self-supporting fabric structures[based upon the infrastructures of pop-up tents], and fabric ‘plates’. Glass plates and transparent paraphernalia would be interesting to use in correlation with the photosensitive emulsion although this would be a dramatic learning curve and would be impractical to carry out due to the weight of such materials.

Figure surrounded by panels bearing imagery. (Charcoal sketch.)
Figure surrounded by panels bearing imagery. (Charcoal sketch.)

As an additional note, I have been considering a dance for film project and a series of sound and vision projects both as collaborative projects. These will need some elaborating as time goes by. Research into the history of Jazz and current practise performed under the title Jazz is being undertaken at the present moment in time.

Anti-depressants: Art and Action (not really what the post is about)

Falmouth Harbour by William Turner
Falmouth Harbour by William Turner

Turner’s painting, ‘Falmouth Harbour Cornwall’, seems to depict the outcrop that currently habitates the public swimming pool. Obviously there are a few years between now and the time at which Turner made this painting but the level of unemployment depicted has changed very little. It is difficult to get the perspective that Turner found because Falmouth has spread out and added a distinctive urban grey that wasn’t contesting with the sky in 1812.

It remains a painting to be seen though in some contemporary manifestation; largely due to the fact that the idea of revitalizing the archaic representative and narrative style of work that existed within classical painting, and bringing it forward into the age of mechanical reproduction in an accessible way, is a pointless social imperative. Additionally the idea of distorting the status of seemingly untouchable works is of incontestable value to art and society equally, the ursurping of pedastols ought to be a promoted way of life and should replace the current ideological epidemic of self-deprecative living.

Another underlying purpose to this work is to liven up and rekindle the cultural identity of Falmouth town by unsettling the sediment of daily life, giving rigour to the local cultural situation. This would promote the historical identity of the site as well as a much needed energy towards doing things within the confines of the town.

The site that this work utilises is a fantastic but unused performance space located on the surface of the redundant Woolworths store on the Falmouth highstreet. This work can only be viewed from a few very specific places on the hill facing the coast; which makes the work something of a hidden and secret piece of work which commands a degree of exclusivity.

Roof Space with Turner Painting not where it will be actually positioned because it is too far to the right
Roof Space with Turner Painting not where it will be actually positioned because it is too far to the right

The image itself is approximately of the proportions 160cm by 240cm and is framed in a classically styled gold frame. Usually the frame is described as that, “gold”, with no further details outlining the structure of the device [device is used because of the utilitarian nature of the frame [framing device]]. Normally frames are constructed out of plaster of wood but this frame is a blend of wire, papier mache and fabrics. It is then painted gold. It must be sexy.

 

Its a public art piece…

Developing figures using wireframe and fabrics
Developing figures using wireframe and fabrics

So why the figure? For the world of reason I would define my intentions even though it ought to be acceptable to use intuition as rationale for the creative process. As it stands one does see the figure primarily as an intuitive response and reflection upon site and situation. The figure is a life size representation of a man who sits perched high above the ground on the top of the front wall to an abandoned, burnt out, and decrepit house. The roof having fallen in long ago, this house has been left to accumulate junk within its corpus.

One would approach this property either from the hill above, following a path down round the side of the house, or from the high street, an alley way leading to this site. As it is night the house is washed in the unnatural glow of the wall light fittings set on the rear end of the pub adjacent. The figure sits in the upper reaches of this light, looking down on any pedestrian that passes through the space. The space is a transitional one, there is no reason to stop here, it is not particularly inviting, there are no attractive plants, the ground is part asphalt, a car park, and part concrete. If one was to approach this situation from behind, by following the steps that led down the steep hill, the view would be of a figure in silhouette hunched over the wall.

Nameless, simultaneously canny as man and uncanny as hooded figure disjointed and unresponsive to the surrounding social situation, yet fully aware of it, fully susceptible to its gaze and prejudices, the spectacle performs two roles. Firstly as an atmospheric visually sensual character in a scenario involving the audience member. A situation that is deigned to draw attention to the run down nature of the site, the character of the house, and the perceptive mentality of the audience member. Visually there are two lost souls squatting together in Falmouth town, the loneliness of these individuals ought to resonate in all observers, they are inherently alone yet there is release from this, there can also be a recognition of this fact and this is meant in a positive way.

The secondary purpose of the figure is to highlight the towns plague of unemployment. Falmouth is currently suffering from grossly inflated living costs and a failing economy, a situation antagonized by the Estate Agencies who maintain highly unattainable leasing fees that independent businesses simply cannot afford to meet. Those caught in the local situation, a situation not exclusive to Falmouth or Cornwall, are left without work in an economic conoundrum where they cannot add to or become an active part of an economy.

The purpose of the figure is unfixed and unstated, audience members are made aware through circumstance, maybe through word of mouth. The affect of the image on the psyche is negotiated by the audience members and the society within which the piece exists.

Character superimposed onto burnt out house
Character superimposed onto burnt out house